QUESTIONS ABOUT BEER GROWLERS

What is a Growler?

Copp Brewery now sells and fills beer growlers! This is our most economical 'Beer-to-Go' model.A growler is a reusable to-go container to transport your favorite Copp craft beer straight from the tap of our brewery tasting room in Crystal River Florida to your home, party, hotel or holiday get together.  Florida currently only allows 32-ounce beer containers, affectionately known as "grenades", or 128-oz. ones to be refilled but pressure is on the state to allow its breweries to fill industry standard 64-ounce growlers.  


Where do I get my growler?

Right here at Copp Brewery.  You pay a very modest one time cost for the 32-ounce or 128-ounce container (to cover our cost) and it's yours forever! 

After that, every time you stop in to refill your growler, you only pay for the contents and you'll get a discount.  Once you purchase the growler, it's yours, and within two to four fills you've recouped your cost. While we do not repurchase growlers, full or empty, they make great gifts or souvenirs.  Tourists enjoy them as much as our local patrons.  They can enjoy our fine craft beers in the comfort of their hotel room or while visiting family or friends and, when their stay is over, bring the empty growler home as a momento of good times in Crystal River! 


Copp craft beer is available to-go straight from the tap in 32oz. growler, 32oz. growler with handle, or gallon growler


Will you fill another brewery's growler with your beer?

Regrettably, we won't. There are two reasons. First, it is technically illegal. We would be putting a beer in a growler that isn't correctly labeled. That is a violation of State and Federal law. Secondly, we take great care in creating our craft beer and wouldn't want another establishment to get credit for our products.


Can I buy any of your beers to go in my growler?

Almost.  Sometimes we offer an extremely limited version of a beer or one that is not conducive to growler fills, and we reserve the right to not fill with those beers and offer them only for on premises consumption by our guests.  Other than that, it's your pleasure (as well as ours.)


How long does the beer in a growler last?

Assuming you properly refrigerate it since our craft ales are unpasteurized, your beer will easily last a week and taste just as fresh as straight from the tap. It is not unheard of for the beer to still taste fresh even after a month or more.

As soon as you open it, though, your time is limited. Not because it will not taste fresh, but because it will go flat. Refrigerate the growler and it's remaining contents until you're ready for it again, preferably within the next day.  Should your beer go flat before you've finished the growler, we've found that you can pour about three quarters of your pint glass full with flat beer, and top it off with some "neutral" beer out of a bottle to help with the carbonation, and get you through your crisis. The other thing you can do with your flat beer is cook with it.  Never waste good beer.


What do I do with my empty growler?

Rinse, Refill, Enjoy, Repeat.

Why did you start selling growlers:

Well the pictures at the top left sort of illustrate our story.  Residents and visitors to Crystal River, Citrus County, Florida, wanted fine quality craft beer.  So we opened our brew pub in May 2012.  As word spread, so did our popularity.  Residents and visitors to our brew pub wanted a way to also enjoy our beers off premises, be it in the comfort of their homes or hotel rooms, or wherever else permitted, and especially when we were closed.  So we became a full brewery in April 2013, offering our craft beers to go in refillable growlers,  Enjoy, Rinse, Refill, Repeat.

Lastly, how did growlers come to be called growlers?

Over one hundred years ago, a growler was a pail with a lid on it.  Wooden growlers gave way to metal growlers and people hauled them from the pub to home or the workplace to enjoy fresh beer at their leisure or at work. This early growler was obviously meant for immediate consumption. Perhaps it growled when the carbon dioxide escaped; maybe it was the rumble from the workman's hungry stomach at lunch just before the container was opened. Whatever it was, the name stuck. One hundred years ago, kids used to lug these covered buckets of beer to workers at lunch and to their parents at the end of the day. They called their task "rushing the growler" and the kids, or even adults, who rushed the growlers were called "Bucket Boys". 




COPP WINERY & BREWERY
11 NE 4th Avenue, Crystal River, Florida 34429
(across from the Post Office, 1 block west of Hwy 19, & Big Lots)
1-352-564-9463